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Bravo Bounce – moonbounce, waterslide and party rentals servicing Delaware


www.bravobounce.com – featuring our Inflatable Obstacle Course featured at the YMCA in Delaware. The mega course obstacle course offers 100ft of inflatable f…

STS-125 launch (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4)


en.wikipedia.org Mission name STS-125 Space shuttle Atlantis Launch pad LC-39A Launch date May 11, 2009, 2:01:56 pm EDT (18:01:56 UTC) Landing May 24, 2009, 11:39:05 am EDT (15:39:05 UTC) Runway 22 – Edwards Air Force Base Mission duration 12 days, 21 hours, 37 minutes, 9 seconds Number of orbits 197 Apogee 578 km Perigee 486 km Orbital period 97 min Orbital altitude 320 nautical miles (570 km) Orbital inclination 28.5° at 304 nautical miles Distance traveled 5.3 million miles www.nasa.gov Veteran astronaut Scott D. Altman commanded the final space shuttle mission to Hubble. Retired Navy Capt. Gregory C. Johnson served as pilot. Mission specialists included veteran spacewalkers John M. Grunsfeld and Michael J. Massimino and first-time space fliers Andrew J. Feustel, Michael T. Good and K. Megan McArthur. Atlantis astronauts repaired and upgraded the Hubble Space Telescope, conducting five spacewalks during their mission to extend the life of the orbiting observatory. They successfully installed two new instruments and repaired two others, bringing them back to life, replaced gyroscopes and batteries, and added new thermal insulation panels to protect the orbiting observatory. The result is six working, complementary science instruments with capabilities beyond what was available and an extended operational lifespan until at least 2014. With the newly installed Wide Field Camera, Hubble will be able to observe in ultraviolet and infrared spectrums as well as visible light

STS-125, tribute to Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4


en.wikipedia.org Mission name STS-125 Space shuttle Atlantis Launch pad LC-39A Launch date May 11, 2009, 2:01:56 pm EDT (18:01:56 UTC) Landing May 24, 2009, 11:39:05 am EDT (15:39:05 UTC) Runway 22 – Edwards Air Force Base Mission duration 12 days, 21 hours, 37 minutes, 9 seconds Number of orbits 197 Apogee 578 km Perigee 486 km Orbital period 97 min Orbital altitude 320 nautical miles (570 km) Orbital inclination 28.5° at 304 nautical miles Distance traveled 5.3 million miles www.nasa.gov Veteran astronaut Scott D. Altman commanded the final space shuttle mission to Hubble. Retired Navy Capt. Gregory C. Johnson served as pilot. Mission specialists included veteran spacewalkers John M. Grunsfeld and Michael J. Massimino and first-time space fliers Andrew J. Feustel, Michael T. Good and K. Megan McArthur. Atlantis astronauts repaired and upgraded the Hubble Space Telescope, conducting five spacewalks during their mission to extend the life of the orbiting observatory. They successfully installed two new instruments and repaired two others, bringing them back to life, replaced gyroscopes and batteries, and added new thermal insulation panels to protect the orbiting observatory. The result is six working, complementary science instruments with capabilities beyond what was available and an extended operational lifespan until at least 2014. With the newly installed Wide Field Camera, Hubble will be able to observe in ultraviolet and infrared spectrums as well as visible light

John Grunsfeld – Hubble Servicing Mission 4


Another lecture in IHMC’s award winning lecture series. www.ihmc.us In May 2009 a team of astronauts flew to the Hubble Space Telescope on space shuttle Atlantis. On their 13 day mission and over the course of 5 spacewalks they completed an extreme makeover of the orbiting observatory. They installed the Wide Field Camera- 3, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, repaired the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, as well as a number of maintenance activities. The Hubble Space Telescope story has been a fascinating study in public policy, engineering, ethics, and science. For the first time on orbit the Hubble has a full complement of instruments capable of performing state-of-the-art observations from the near infra-red to the ultraviolet end of the spectrum. The early results of the new and repaired instruments hint at a bright scientific future for Hubble and will be presented in the talk as well as a narrative of the adventures on orbit. Dr. John M. Grunsfeld was recently appointed Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). A veteran of five space flights, including three missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope – STS-103 in Dec. 1999, STS-109 in March 2002, and STS-125 in May 2009 – Grunsfeld has logged over 835 hours in space, including nearly 60 hours of Extravehicular Activity during eight space walks. He served as the NASA Chief Scientist detailed to NASA Headquarters in 2003-2004, where he helped develop

Hubblecast 28: The fifth and final Hubble servicing mission


Shuttle astronauts will visit the Hubble Space Telescope for the final time in May 2009. In five bold and daring spacewalks, they will upgrade Hubble’s instruments allowing it to continue making remarkable scientific discoveries well into the next decade. Download it from: www.spacetelescope.org Credit: ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser, Lars Lindberg Christensen & Colleen Sharkey) Visual design & Editing: Martin Kornmesser Animations: Martin Kornmesser Web Hosting: Leibniz-Rechenzentrum (LRZ) Web Technical Support: Lars Holm Nielsen & Raquel Yumi Shida Written by: Lars Lindberg Christensen Host: Dr. J Narration: Gaitee Hussain Cinematography: Peter Rixner Music: movetwo STS-25 footage: NASA Directed by: Lars Lindberg Christensen & Colleen Sharkey

Space Shuttle STS-125 Atlantis Hubble Space Telescope Final Servicing Mission HST SM-04 2009 NASA


more at scitech.quickfound.net scitech.quickfound.net “STS-125 Post Flight Presentation (Un-Narrated) “Commander: Scott D. Altman Pilot: Gregory C. Johnson Mission Specialists: Andrew J. Feustel, Michael T. Good, John M. Grunsfeld, Michael J. Massimino, K. Megan McArthur Dates: May 11-24, 2009 Vehicle: Atlantis OV-104 Payloads: Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission SM-04″ NASA film JSC-2266 This film has live sound in parts, but has no narration. Public domain film from NASA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization. en.wikipedia.org STS-125, or HST-SM4 (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4), was the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Launch occurred on 11 May 2009 at 2:01 pm EDT. Landing occurred on 24 May at 11:39 am EDT, with the mission lasting a total of just under 13 days. Space Shuttle Atlantis carried two new instruments to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. The mission also replaced a Fine Guidance Sensor, six gyroscopes, and two battery unit modules to allow the telescope to continue to function at least through 2014. The crew also installed new thermal blanket insulating panels to provide improved thermal protection, and a soft-capture mechanism that would aid in

Space Shuttle STS-109 Columbia Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission SM3B 2002 NASA


more at scitech.quickfound.net ‘JSC1915 – (2002) – 17 Minutes Commander: Scott D. Altman Pilot: Duane G. Carey Mission Specialists: John M. Grunsfeld, Nancy J. Currie, Richard M. Linnehan, James H. Newman, Michael J. Massimino Dates: March 1-12, 2002 Vehicle: Columbia OV-102 Payloads: HST Repair Landing Site: Runway 33 at Kennedy Space Center, FL’ NASA film JSC-1915 Public domain film from NASA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization. en.wikipedia.org STS-109 (SM3B) was a Space Shuttle mission that launched from the Kennedy Space Center on 1 March 2002. It was the 108th mission of the Space Shuttle program, the 27th flight of the orbiter Columbia and the fourth servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope. It was also the last successful mission of the orbiter Columbia before the ill-fated STS-107 mission, which culminated in the Columbia Disaster. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was placed in orbit during mission STS-31 on 25 April 1990. Initially designed to operate for 15 years, plans for periodic service and refurbishment were incorporated into its mission from the start. After the successful completion of the second planned service mission (SM2) by the crew of STS-82 in February 1997, three of HST’s six gyroscopes failed. NASA decided to split the third planned service mission into

Atlantis Secures Hubble; Servicing Spacewalks Begin Thursday


EVA 1 by Grunsfeld and Feustel Wide Field Camera III Installation, Science Instrument Command and Data Handling Computer, Soft Capture Mechanism Installation and Latch Over Centerline Kit Installation

Does anyone know if there are any double decker party bus rentals servicing arizona?

Not like a london double decker, more of an actually party bus with two layers. Otherwise a fun party bus that can hold more than 50 people?